Opiyo, P.O., Agong, S.G., Awuor, F.A. and Gilani, M. Urban Dynamics of Food Loss and Waste: Challenges and Opportunities for Improving Food Security in Kisumu, Kenya. Journal of Food Security. 2021; 9(1):1-7. doi: 10.12691/jfs

Platform
Kisumu
Publication type
Scientific article (peer-reviewed)
Journal
Journal of Food Security
Author(s)
Paul Otieno Opiyo Stephen Gaya Agong Frankline Otiende Awuor Munira Gilani
Published year
Subject
Food security
Tags
Urban food security Food supply chain Food loss and waste Kisumu Urban dynamics

 

Abstract

The 21st Century has witnessed a rapid growth in global population characterised by an increasing proportion of urban dwellers. While feeding this growing urban population is a challenge, estimates indicate that one-third of all food produced in the world gets lost or wasted. This study, premised on the FAO conceptual framework of food loss and food waste, sought to identify the linkages between urban dynamics and the causes of food loss and waste along the food supply chain. The study involved data mining, review, thematic analysis and integration of both primary and secondary data from three research projects conducted in Kisumu by Kisumu Local Interaction Platform (KLIP). The study found that Kisumu city and the wider county is deficient in food production; more than 65% of the city population resides in informal settlements, with inadequate infrastructure and services; and food insecurity is prevalent. Though accurate quantitative data was not available on the food lost at the various stages of the supply chain, food losses were noted at the all stages. Food losses at production and post harvest handling stages were caused by flooding, pests, and contamination. Food losses during processing were minimal due to fewer food processing industries in the city. Most food products from small scale producers were transported via public road transport, often without proper packaging leading to physical damage and contamination. At the market stage, inadequacy of food storage and preservation facilities led to food losses. At the consumption stage, food waste was low due to poverty as households generally buy smaller amounts of food on a day to day basis. However, some food is wasted in restaurants patronized by middle and upper income segments of the population. Reducing loss and waste across the food value chain can contribute to improving food and nutrition security.

Pretorius, D. (2020) Access for Just Cities Master Report.

Platform
Gothenburg
Publication type
Report/Paper/Working paper/Brief
Projects
Accessible Cities
Author(s)
Deon Pretorius
Published year

 

Abstract

The purpose of this Master Report is to capture the theoretical aspects, insights, learnings and conclusions based on the reports and activities of the Access for Just Cities project over the period of 2017 to 2020. This project is part of the partnership between the municipalities of Gothenburg / Nelson Mandela Bay (NMB) with a focus on townships and communities on the urban edge of these two cities. The overall objective is to enhance access in terms of spatial/physical, social/democratic, economic and notional terms.

Understanding the role of cities in the Covid-19 pandemic can help us build a sustainable and equal future, David Simon writes in the Conversation. From its origin in Wuhan, China, COVID-19 has spread to become a predominantly urban-focused pandemic. Although much data on the...

Opiyo, P. and Agong', S.G. (2020) Nexus between Urban Food System and Other Urban Systems: Exploring Opportunities for Improving Food Security in Kisumu, Kenya, Social and Economic Geography. 2020; 5(1):20-28. doi: 10.12691/seg-5-1-4

Platform
Kisumu
Publication type
Scientific article (peer-reviewed)
Projects
Urban food security and value addition
DOI
10.12691/seg-5-1-4

 

Abstract

The world population is growing and shifting in character from to predominantly rural to increasingly
urban. It is projected that by 2050, two thirds of the world’s population will be living in urban areas. The food
system of cities has an impact on the health and wellbeing of residents. This study is a review of data and integration
of findings from two projects done in Kisumu from 2016 - 2020: Consuming Urban Poverty (CUP) project and
Nourishing Spaces (NS) project. The two projects employed both qualitative and quantitative methods of data
collection, which were supplemented by desktop research involving an analysis of published literature. Peri-urban
households were found to be more food insecure as compared to residents of core urban areas, attributed to urban
sprawl. Municipal markets were located in areas less accessible to poor residents leading to the growth of informal
food retail in the city. Distant production sources and poor road network drive up the cost of food in the city. More
than 65 per cent of residents live in informal settlements in poor housing units with inadequate food storage and
kitchen facilities, promoting consumption of processed foods. Inadequate water, sanitation and energy at both
household and market levels was found to hinder food security. Unemployment contributed to food insecurity.
Thirty one per cent of residents 20 years and above were unemployed in a city in which 67 per cent bought more
than 75 percent of the total food consumed from the market. Most residents have a rural home due to cultural
reasons and they occasionally obtain food from their rural homes. The food system of Kisumu city is influenced by
other urban systems and it is important to consider the whole system in policy conversations to alleviate food
insecurity in the city.

Lorentzi, Å. (2020) Recommendations for a reflective practice and approach based on dialogue in everyday work in municipalities – for sustainable, accessible and just cities. Mistra Urban Futures Policy Brief 2020:3

Platform
Gothenburg
Publication type
Report/Paper/Working paper/Brief
Projects
Accessible Cities
Author(s)
Åsa Lorentzi
Published year

 

Abstract

Creating just and accessible cities demands changes in how municipalities and public sector handle complex issues such as urban planning and distribution of welfare due to ongoing societal transformation . Considerable attention needs to be paid to increasing inequality, heterogeneity and unevenly spread lack of trust. C omplex challenges need to involve those concerned, those who live, reside and work in the city and community. Therefor municipalities need to create infra structure and a culture that include reflective practice in everyday work, both with citizens, civil society and different actors and within the municipality itself. The reflective practice must be lived on all levels in organizations and in all meetings.

Getting the Mistra Urban Futures team of seven plaforms and partners together for a study of local responses to the COVID-19 was easily done and some of the results were presented at an Urban Thinkers Campus in July, as part of the Sida-funded Consolidation Programme.

Cirolia, L. R. (2020). Fractured fiscal authority and fragmented infrastructures: Financing sustainable urban development in Sub-Saharan Africa. Habitat International, 104, 102233. doi:10.1016/j.habitatint.2020.102233

Platform
Cape Town
Publication type
Scientific article (peer-reviewed)
Projects
Urban Public Finance
DOI Title
Fractured fiscal authority and fragmented infrastructures: Financing sustainable urban development in Sub-Saharan Africa
Journal
Habitat International
ISSN/ISBN
0197-3975
DOI
10.1016/j.habitatint.2020.102233
Author(s)
Liza Rose Cirolia
Published year
Subject
Urban Studies

 

Abstract

The current global development agendas provide relatively little guidance on how the incredible challenge of sustainable urban development in Africa can and should be financed. This paper makes the case for understanding this development challenge at the nexus of urban governance and city infrastructure. Tracing African urban development trends over the post-colonial period, the paper makes three arguments. First, African cities experience fractured fiscal authority. Decentralization reforms have resulted in contested and complex city governance arrangements. Second, large scale infrastructure investments have been the focus of donors and investors. This has resulted in fragmented networks and systems. Finally, these two processes together have created fertile ground for the emergence of hybrid systems of service delivery in cities. This has implications for both how urban services are governed and their material arrangements. This reality, and the underlying processes which contributed to its production, are under-accounted for within global development discourses. In conclusion, it is crucial that new models of infrastructure finance are developed to respond to the fractured fiscal authority, fragmented infrastructure networks, and hybrid service delivery patterns which characterise African cities.

Platform
Cape Town
Publication type
Scientific article (peer-reviewed)
Projects
Urban Public Finance
Journal
Geoforum
Author(s)
Liza Cirolia

 

Abstract

The study of fiscal geographies foregrounds the spatialities of fiscal instruments, such as taxes or bonds. Of central concern in the fiscal geographies literature are the ways that fiscal spaces are co-constituted with stateform and the built environment. Recent scholarship argues for ‘placing’ fiscal geographies in urban studies, drawing attention to the ways in which fiscal tools shape urban governance and the material development of city spaces. I build on this work, further placing fiscal geographies in the context of an ordinary city in Africa, Kisumu (Kenya). Inspired by conceptual and methodological debates within the ‘African urbanism’ literature, I provide a rich account of two ‘sites’ through which Kisumu’s fiscal geographies are given effect. First, I focus on the newly formed Kisumu County Government. The County represents a reterritorialization of urban authority. This authority is given substance, and contested, through fiscal instruments. Second, I focus on low-level bureaucrats. I foreground the relationship between fiscal policy and everyday practices. These two sites draw our attention to the multiple and relational logics at play in Kisumu’s fiscal geographies.