Reflection when Implementing

What?

During the implementation it is also important to examine how the project relates to the qualities for joint knowledge production.

How?

  • How collection of information (data) will be done, and who will do the work?
  • How interpretation and analysis will be done, and who will do the work?
  • How the work of report-writing will be done, and who will do it?
  • What are the consequences of having different perspectives and sources of knowledge?
          How is this dealt with in science and practice?
  • What is the division of work for data collection, analysis and writing?
  • Which elements do we intend to collaborate on, and why?
  • Which elements do we intend to work on individually, and why?
  • What will we gain and what will we lose by doing what we have planned?
  • How can we include different perspectives and ways of interpreting and understanding the data collected?
  • Are there connections between different ways of interpreting and understanding data?
  • Are there perspectives that have to be "abandoned" because they, for some reason, do not fit into the picture which is
          emerging?
  • What have we learned from cooperating on the analysis?
  • What are the results/answers to questions?
  • Which results concern the participants' regular operations, and in what way?
  • What else needs to be done so that more of those who are involved in these operations take an interest in the results
          and their application?
  • Which knowledge and insights generated by the project are the most important, and how can they be transferred to
          other contexts?
  • How can the application of relevant project results be spread locally, nationally and perhaps to the centre's other
          platforms?
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